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SPECIAL: The Bavarian organ landscape - Part 2

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SPECIAL: The Bavarian organ landscape – Part 2
SPECIAL: The Bavarian organ landscape – Part 2
SPECIAL: The Bavarian organ landscape – Part 2
SPECIAL: The Bavarian organ landscape – Part 2
Ansbach, St.Gumbertus Stadtkirche and the Wiegleorgan © Burkhard Mücke
In 2007, an historic organ was rebuilt in the Protestant town church of St. Gumbertus in Ansbach. The Dutch organ-building company Reil built a new organ in the Baroque case, which is an exact reconstruction of the original Wiegleb. 48 stops are distributed over three manual and pedal, with some stops of the III manual being housed in an echo box (a predecessor of the Swell). The instrument is ideally suited for the interpretation of the music of Central German masters – especially, of course, the music of Johann Sebastian Bach.
The impressive Renaissance prospect with its large hinged wings dates back to the organ builder Marx Günzer in 1608. The last organ in this case was a large Romantic organ by Koulen & Sohn with III/73 from 1903, from which some pipework, including the two 32′ stops, was transferred to the present instrument in 1982 by organ builder Sandtner. With 68 stops, the Sandtner organ is a little smaller than its predecessor, but it has a console with four manuals. A special feature is, among other things, the two Chamades 16′ and 8′, which can be coupled to any keyboard as a floating division. Furthermore, in the transept gallery there is a historic choir organ made by Hindelang in 1925 with 19 stops, which can also be played from the console of the main organ as a remote organ.
SPECIAL: The Bavarian organ landscape – Part 2
Mary Günzer organ, Augsburg © St. Ulrich und Afra
SPECIAL: The Bavarian organ landscape – Part 2
St. Anna organ © Roswitha Dorfner
The unique organ prospect of the pilgrimage basilica of St. Anna extends over both galleries. While the main case on the upper gallery is still by Koulen (1916), the two 32′ pedal towers and the Rückpositiv in between were added by Gerhard Schmid in 1976 in the course of the new organ construction. The instrument has five manuals and 86 stops, including curious aliquots such as Undecime 8/11′ and Tredecime 8/13′, as well as a Romantic-era Swell, whose stops also originate from the former Koulen organ of 1916, as well as the two piercing reeds Bassoon 16′ and Contratuba 32′!
SPECIAL: The Bavarian organ landscape – Part 2
Carl Friedrich Meyer © Sigrid Schüßler
Carl Friedrich Meyer has been deanery cantor in Ansbach since 2014 and previously worked in various positions in Franconia. He completed his studies in Bayreuth at what is now the College of Protestant Church Music. He has mastered the entire spectrum of cantorial activity: Children’s, youth, senior and trombone choir music as well as demanding oratorio performances with choir and orchestra. It can also be a performance under the motto “Klassik Rockt!”… He makes the organs in his area of responsibility sound virtuosic and imaginative. Deanery Cantor | Protestant Church Music in the Deanery of Ansbach (an-klang.info)
Peter Bader has to deal with Mozart almost every day, because the way up to the gallery of the Basilica of St. Ulrich and Afra leads over the narrow “Mozart Staircase”. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was connected to the city of Augsburg through his father Leopold and his much-loved “Bäsle”. Peter Bader graduated from the Nuremberg-Augsburg Academy of Music with a master’s degree. On the total of three organs in the basilica, he not only plays Mozart, but performs a large variety of repertoire and works from all epochs.
SPECIAL: The Bavarian organ landscape – Part 2
Peter Bader © Karin Demartin
SPECIAL: The Bavarian organ landscape – Part 2
Stephan Thinnes © Roswitha Dorfner
Stephan Thinnes took up his post as Stiftskapellmeister at the Basilica of St. Anna in the famous Upper Bavarian pilgrimage town of Altötting in July 2020, i.e. at a time when church music work with choirs was limited by many imponderables due to the pandemic. He was all the more pleased to be able to “reach into the full” at the organ. Thinnes studied in Mainz and Saarbrücken and acquired a broad musical horizon in numerous master classes in Germany, but also in Paris and Vienna – as a foundation for his diverse activities as organist, choirmaster, arranger, lecturer and organ expert.

SPECIAL: The Bavarian organ landscape - Part 2

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