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Special Dresden

Frauenkirche - Hofkirche - Kulturpalast - Kreuzkirche in Dresden, Germany

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Special Dresden: Frauenkirche – Hofkirche – Kulturpalast – Kreuzkirche in Dresden, Germany
Special Dresden: Frauenkirche – Hofkirche – Kulturpalast – Kreuzkirche in Dresden, Germany
Special Dresden: Frauenkirche – Hofkirche – Kulturpalast – Kreuzkirche in Dresden, Germany
Special Dresden: Frauenkirche – Hofkirche – Kulturpalast – Kreuzkirche in Dresden, Germany
Dresden Cathedral, Gottfried Silbermann organ
The Dresden Cathedral, has one of the most important organs in the world! With 47 stops, it is the largest and also the last organ by the famous Saxon organ builder Gottfried Silbermann (1683-1753), which could only be finally completed after his death by his pupil Zacharias Hildebrandt. The fact that this valuable instrument has survived until today is only due to its removal in 1944 to the cloister of Marienstern Monastery! The original case, which was not dismantled at the time, was lost during the bombing of Dresden in the Second World War and was reconstructed in the 1980s. Therefore, today the instrument presents itself again in its original splendour and is predestined for the interpretation of the music of Johann Sebastian Bach.
The Protestant Frauenkirche once had an important Silbermann organ, which, however, had undergone several major changes and whose remains were completely destroyed along with the church during the devastating night of bombing on 13/14 February 1945. During the faithful reconstruction of the Frauenkirche, the question arose as to whether the Silbermann organ had to be reconstructed just as faithfully. It was decided against an exact reconstruction in Silbermann’s style, but limited itself to a restoration of the organ prospect and commissioned the French organ building company Daniel Kern (Strasbourg) with the construction of a modern universal 67-stop organ, which was inaugurated in 2005. The disposition of the Hauptwerk (I), Oberwerk (II) and Brustwerk (IV) was partly inspired by Silbermann dispositions without copying them exactly, while the Schwellwerk (III) is clearly influenced by the French Symphonic style.
Special Dresden: Frauenkirche – Hofkirche – Kulturpalast – Kreuzkirche in Dresden, Germany
Dresden, Frauenkirche, Gottfried Silbermann organ
Special Dresden: Frauenkirche – Hofkirche – Kulturpalast – Kreuzkirche in Dresden, Germany
Dresden, Kreuzkirche Jehmlich organ (left)
Dresden Kulturpalast, Eule organ (right)
The Jehmlich organ in the Kreuzkirche in Dresden, built in 1963, is an outstanding example of an instrument in the Neo-Baroque style propagated by the North German organ reform movement. Even the sight of the facade reveals the stylistic orientation through its classical arrangement of Werke with Brustwerk, Hauptwerk and Oberwerk on top of each other and the Pedal towers on the left and right, but also through the use of new materials such as copper pipes or reed pipes in the facade. In the disposition there are numerous short-stemmed reed stops characteristic of the Neo-Baroque, such as Bärpfeife 8′, Rohrschalmei 4′ and Trichterregal 4′ and bright coloured aliquots, such as Septime 1 1/7′, Hornwerk 2-3f and Tonus fabri 2f. During the last renovation in 2008 by the Jehmlich company, the voicing of the 80 stops was revised and improved with regard to more fundamental tone and sonic viability.

Dresden Kulturpalast

In 2017, the renovated Kulturpalast Dresden was equipped with a modern concert organ from the Eule company in nearby Bautzen. Behind an impressive free-standing pipe prospect, 67 stops are distributed over four manuals and pedal. A special feature is the fourth manual (Solo), on which solo voices are located on the one hand, but also the reed battery of the Swell (III) on the other hand, which can be coupled separately.
Special Dresden: Frauenkirche – Hofkirche – Kulturpalast – Kreuzkirche in Dresden, Germany
Holger Gehring © C S.Dittrich
Being organist at the Kreuzkirche Dresden is one of the most traditional musical posts in Germany. Holger Gehring has held this office since 2004. He is also a lecturer at the State College of Music and the College of Church Music in Dresden and teaches at master classes and advanced training courses. As organ expert of the church of Saxony, he is familiar with numerous historical and newer instruments in the region. Since September 2017 he has also been the new concert hall organist in the Kulturpalast Dresden. An active solo concert activity as an organist and harpsichordist takes him throughout Germany and abroad. Holger Gehring studied church music and organ at the conservatories of Lübeck, Stuttgart and Frankfurt. At the Schola Cantorum in Basel he studied harpsichord and early music.
Samuel Kummer has a unique workplace. Almost every day he sits as organist in the gallery of the rebuilt Frauenkirche in Dresden. Since 2005, he has been responsible for the entire organ there, playing at church services and in concerts and directing the organ concert series he initiated. Kummer studied in his hometown of Stuttgart and graduated with a distinction in organ improvisation, a subject he now teaches himself at the Dresden College of Church Music. He was a prize-winner at the “Concours L’Europe et L’Orgue” in Maastricht in 1996 and at the International Organ Competition Odense in 1998. He also maintain an active international concert schedule. He has released three CDs to date, and received the Diapason d’Or 9/2008 for his Vierne recording.
Special Dresden: Frauenkirche – Hofkirche – Kulturpalast – Kreuzkirche in Dresden, Germany
Samuel Kummer © SK
Special Dresden: Frauenkirche – Hofkirche – Kulturpalast – Kreuzkirche in Dresden, Germany
Matthias Grünert © ITCAM
Matthias Grünert hails from Nuremberg and received his first musical impressions in the Windsbacher Knabenchor. He studied church music, singing and organ at the conservatories in Bayreuth and Lübeck. Since 2005, he has been artistically responsible for the church music of the Frauenkirche in Dresden as its first cantor. He founded various vocal and instrumental ensembles at the Frauenkirche and cultivates the well-known large repertoire for choir and orchestra in liturgy and concerts, but is also committed to the rediscovery of Dresden composers of the Baroque and Classical periods. As an organist, he performs as a soloist and as a duo partner at home and abroad.
Sebastian Freitag, in Paderborn geboren, studierte Kirchenmusik (A-Examen) und Orgel (Konzertexamen) an der Hochschule für Musik in Detmold bei Gerhard Weinberger, Martin Sander sowie Tomasz Adam Nowak. Seit März 2022 wirkt er als Domorganist in Dresden an der letzten und größten Orgel aus der Werkstatt Gottfried Silbermanns. Zuvor war er von 2013-2022 als Dekanatskirchenmusiker und von 2011-2013 als Interims-Domorganist in Paderborn tätig. 2017-2021 hatte er ferner einen Lehrauftrag für Orgel an der Universität Paderborn. Zyklisch spielte er die Gesamtwerke von Bach (2018), Franck (2019) und Buxtehude (2021) in Paderborn. Zwei CD-Einspielungen sowie Aufnahmen für Fernsehen und Rundfunk runden seine Tätigkeit ab.
Special Dresden: Frauenkirche – Hofkirche – Kulturpalast – Kreuzkirche in Dresden, Germany
Sebastian Freitag © Sebastian Freitag

Special Dresden

Frauenkirche – Hofkirche – Kulturpalast – Kreuzkirche in Dresden, Germany

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